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A number of the UCLan Outdoor team presented at the Adventure Sports Coaching Conference at   Plas y Brenin earlier this year demonstrating the continuing participation of staff in industry

Presentations included:

Prof Dave Collins and Dr Loel Collins: Redesigning Training and Accreditation Systems in Adventure Sports Coaching
Dr Howie Carson and Chris Eastabrook: Adaptive Automaticity in Adventure Sport: Contemporary Views And implications
Sharon Rosser: Understanding successful aging through Nature Challenge Activities, insights from the older adult climbers, cavers and sea kayakers
Dr Paul Gray: Using Social Interaction to promote, All good coaching is individualised
Dr Helen Hooper, Rosemary Smith and Cath Wilson: Learning through sharing experiences: critical reflections of the experiences of three female outdoor instructors.
Abstracts can be found here 
Recent posts

Outdoor Learning – Gallery Event – Art displays

Tuesday 6th March 2018
The third year Outdoor students on the Outdoor Image module all presented their artwork and portfolios from a year of deep thinking and philosophising. The Gallery Event is the culmination of their learning journey guided by Clive Palmer who claims, amongst many things, “that education should be memorable, not forgettable”. What the students presented, and the way they presented it was professional and memorable for very positive reasons in [Outdoor] Education. The topics were as varied as the mediums used to create the artworks, for example, from our dependence on social media, devilish artificial intelligence, plastic poisoning in the oceans to poetry and plays that celebrate the joy of humanity. Social culture and aging and gender issues, animal rights and human rights, the freedom of the environment and the importance of the Outdoors for our very being. There were short stories, sculptures, speeches, creations in metal, paper-Mache, wood and clay, it was all…

MA Outdoor Practice

The Masters in Outdoor Practice is designed to enable those working in the broad professional environment of the outdoors to engage with postgraduate study. It is delivered by a team of practitioners, educationalists and researchers in the outdoors. The first year of the course involves taught modules which are delivered at weekends, with subsequent modules providing the opportunity to specialise in your own field of practice through research and/or innovation. A special feature of this innovative course is the flexibility to accommodate a diverse range of interests and promote learning through a portfolio of assessments that appropriately meet the needs of students. Thus, the ethos of the course is to enable students to follow their interests and design their own pathway through a master's programme.

Click here for further information

Email : Rose Powell,

Students conquer Mt Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

During the Summer of 2016, Louis Sivori and Jake Ditcham scaled the 5895m peak of Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. This was in aid of the charity Dig Deep, which provides fresh drinking water and sanitation to families in both Kenya and Tanzania.
The trek took a total of 7 days in which they summited very early on day 6.
 Upon completion Louis commented;
"It was the toughest challenge I’ve ever had to face in my life. The experience and benefits I will take from it are amazing”
“It is a wonderful achievement and we both had the greatest time. I would fully recommend this to anyone and I would happily repeat the adventure again”!

High Praise from External Examiner

Our external examiner provided excellent feedback for both the Ba (Hons) Outdoor Leadership and Adventure Sports Caching Degree. During his visit he commented; Both courses remain relevant to the employment needs across the outdoor learning, leadership and coaching sector.The student learning experience remains of a high quality.The degree programmes timetabling and academic content successfully integrates the work placement and practical components.Dissertations are excellent and publishable.Students are encouraged through formative feedback to produce highly innovative and creative work. This provides great support for the new BA(Hons) Outdoor Adventure Leadership due to start in September 2017.

Uclan Winter skills Scotland Fort William 2016

Day one – Sunday Our First Journey day!
“On Sunday we hiked up towards Buachaille Etive Beag, before turning and heading towards Stob Coire Raineach, learning the basic skills of walking in snow, using crampons and ice axes. Overall it took 5-7 hours, in snow and poor visibility the higher we got up, as well as moderate wind that seem stronger due to the snow and cold. One each took different turns in leading the group and practicing how to walk in snow as it’s different to walking normally. I learnt so many skills for the first time that first day and really enjoyed the day, I know that the others did too.” -Marianne Wilson
Day two – Monday
Our 2nd Journey day!
“For me, Monday was one of the main highlights of the unforgettable trip, we were all pretty equip and knew how to use our crampons and ice axes by then. We also knew how to judge the weather and make sensible decisions on what to do. The instructors kindly gave us the choice of journey or skills, we all choose a journey and …

Expedition to Skye

As part of the TL2124 expedition module. Hannah and Abi organised a trip themselves with the facilitation of their tutor Allison Inkster.

 The journey was planned, designed and carried out by the two of them working as a team, here the link will take you on their journey, covered in a short video filmed and edited by them too.